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Little Fires Everywhere: Review

Little Fires Everywhere: Review

I first heard of Celeste Ng’s book via someone’s facebook post. The name was intriguing and the cover art didn’t give me a great sense of what the book was about. I know they say don’t judge a book by its cover but honestly, we all do it. The more colors your cover has, the more I want to know what it is about. But I placed that book on my back burner, wasn’t sure when I would get to it.

I read her first book, Everything I Never Told You the week before I read Little Fires Everywhere. I am not going to lie, I was a little bit nervous because her debut novel moved really slow for me. But I am glad I decided to finally read her second book.

Little Fires Everywhere does take a little bit of time to get to the main point of the book, or at least the plot that is described on the book jacket; however, this aspect really made the characters more understandable. This book was bigger than her first, but it took me less time to read because I felt that it was an easier read.

There were more themes in this book that were extremely relatable. The plot is a well off family in Shaker Heights wants to adopt a Chinese baby and the town becomes divided. Even though this is what the synopsis says, the main theme of this book (in my opinion) is identity.

Ng’s characters Pearl and Mia are the characters you immediately love, although you have a little hesitance in understanding why Mia would drag her daughter around state to state. But compared to the other families in Shaker Heights, they seem more free spirited. The Richardson family is the family that really grew on me, except Mrs. Richardson. Izzy especially. I saw myself in Izzy quite a bit.

Every single character struggles with their identity in this book and I think as a woman of color that is something that truly resonated with me.

I would read this book if you like a little bit of mystery, but not too much. The book does have quite a bit of flashbacks and they are not clearly stated that we are in a different time period so that was a little confusing and I dare say the books only draw back.

Since I am in grad school and addicted to coffee, I will use cups of coffee to rate books and i give this one:
4 CUPS

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